Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Make Multimedia Presentations by Inserting Videos from Google Drive in Google Slides

Starting today, you can insert and play your Google Drive videos in Google Slides, in addition to videos from YouTube.


Once you’ve added a Drive video to your presentation, you can choose when to start and end it, whether it should autoplay when presenting, and whether it should be muted or play with audio. Simply right-click on the video and select Video options.


If a person viewing your presentation doesn’t have permission to view a video embedded within it, they’ll be prompted to request access.

Note that while you can play Drive videos in Slides on the web and mobile, you can only insert them from the web application. For more details, visit the Google Help Center.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

RESOLVED: Public Safety Office Internet Outage

As of 8:50pm, the internet connectivity issue in Jasper Hall and the Public Safety Office has been RESOLVED. We apologize for any inconvenience that this may have caused.

ITS has been made aware of the internet outage affecting Jasper Hall and Public Safety office around 7:30pm. We are currently troubleshooting and investigating this issue. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Monday, February 20, 2017

RESOLVED - Temporary One Card Outage

An issue caused the One Card database to hang late Sunday evening, affecting the POS and Verify stations on campus.

The database was brought back online around 8:40 am this morning.

The issue has since been diagnosed and a fix has been successfully tested on our test environments.

ITS has put a temporary fix in place that will prevent this from happening again. We are also working on scheduling the necessary system maintenance on our production environment to permanently resolve this issue.

Saturday, February 18, 2017

RESOLVED - Temporary SSO issue with Banner Test Environments

We are currently experiencing a temporary issue with Single Sign On for the Banner Test Environments. We anticipate the issue being resolved by Noon on Saturday, 2/18/2017.

The test databases are up. However, we are currently experiencing an issue with SSO that is preventing access to the test environments for Self-Service, Banner Forms, Workflow, and BDM.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

- - - - -

Updated at 5:34 AM, 2/18/2017:


The issue has been resolved. All systems are back up.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Schedule Meetings more Efficiently with Google Calendar or Doodle

Google Calendar Information:
As part of our ongoing effort to spread knowledge about the productive new Google Calendar Features, want to share how users are able to use Google Calendar to schedule meetings.  

The easiest way to access Google Calendar is to click on the Google Calendar app from your Google Apps launcher at the top right of your Google Desktop Home screen:

The following instructions include how to quickly and easily schedule a meeting with a group of colleagues who are using Google Calendar:
** Be sure to explore the "Find a time for my meeting" section **


If the other guests have shared their calendar with you, you can use the "Find a time" feature to schedule an event at a time that works for everyone. You can compare up to 20 schedules at one time.
Note: The "Find a time" feature is only available while using a computer and the Google Calendar app for Android.
  1. Create a new event, or open an existing event (you may need to click Edit event first).
  2. Click the Find a time tab. If the other guests' calendars are shared with you, you'll see their schedules.
  3. Find a time. Use the arrows at the top to navigate between days.
  4. Once you've found a time, click the area within the calendar grid. The time will update at the top of the page.
  5. Click Save.
Note: You can only edit the event if you created the event yourself, or if the event organizer gave guests permission to modify the event.
All-day events: All-day events are shown at the top of the calendar grid. If a guest has an all-day event, they will appear available in the "Find a time" tab unless their event is set to show as "Busy." To schedule an all-day event, click the Week button and then click the area at the top of a day column.



Doodle: Another Excellent Scheduling App
Great idea to use as an alternative to Google Calendar


What is Doodle?

Doodle is an online scheduling tool that can be used quickly and easily to find a date and time to meet with multiple people.  First you suggest dates and times for your event participants to choose from, then Doodle creates a polling calendar that can be sent to participants for feedback.  As each participant selects the dates and times from the polling calendar that he or she is free, Doodle aggregates the responses and tells you which option works best for everyone.
Getting everyone on the same page is hard enough with just five other coworkers, let alone fifty new volunteers you may have never met.  Doodle can be a valuable tool for coordinating a large event like volunteer training as well as a small event like a monthly meeting with the board.


Doodle in Action

Part of Doodle’s appeal is that it’s so easy to use.  The site walks you through the four steps of creating a polling calendar:
  1. Schedule an Event
  2. Propose Times
  3. Choose Settings
  4. Invite Participants


Each step of the way there are options to make the whole process easier for you and the people you’re trying to meet with.
1. Schedule an Event
The first step in scheduling an event with Doodle is to fill out a simple form with the title, location, and description of the event.  This information will be visible on the poll, letting participants know exactly what the event is.  On this page you will also enter your name as administrator and your e-mail address so that you can receive the link to view, update, or edit the poll.
Notable Features:
  • Easy Directions: The location automatically links to Google Maps, making getting directions a breeze.
  • Your Own Doodle Account: Although you are free to use the site without creating an account, signing in makes checking up on your scheduling polls a lot easier (especially if you have several out at a time).
2. Propose Times
The next screen asks you to choose days and times that you are considering for the event.
Wizard
Notable Features:
  • Time-Zone Support: If you’re scheduling an online event, such as a Twitter chat or a video conference, you can enable time-zone support to keep participants across the country or across the world on the same page.
3. Choose Settings
In this third step, Doodle offers some options so that you can modify the basic poll to suit your specific needs.  These customizable settings allow you to tailor your Doodle scheduling poll to each event.  Among other things, you can use these different settings to transform your scheduling poll into a registration sheet, or to offer extra options to your event participants such as greater privacy.
Notable Features:
  • Yes-No-If need be Poll: In a basic poll, the people you invite can only respond “Yes” or “No.”  This option adds a third possible response, “If need be,” to give you more detailed information on participants’ availability and flexibility.
  • Hidden Poll: Perhaps you are looking to schedule times to meet with donors.  This option allows you to keep each donor’s schedule and availability confidential from the other donors.
  • Limit Number of Participants per Option: For example, setting the group limit to ten people per time slot would be handy if you are looking to conduct feedback meetings with past volunteers.  Once a timeslot has ten names, it will stop being shown as an option.
  • Participant Can Only Choose One Option: This option coupled with limiting the number of participants per option turns the poll into a registration sheet, allowing each participant to sign up for a timeslot on a first-come-first-served basis.
4. Invite Participants
The final step is to send out the invitations.  Doodle has three methods of delivering your poll to participants: email, Facebook, and Twitter.
For smaller or internal meetings, email is the way to go.  But if you are putting together a larger event, like a cookout to thank your volunteers, then a social media platform might be a better choice.  By posting the Doodle poll link on Facebook or Twitter, you can simultaneously advertise your event and find a good day for it.
Notable Features:
  • Import Contacts: Link your Doodle account to your email account to easily import the email addresses of the participants you’re interested in inviting.


The Poll

For the people you have invited, the finished basic poll will look something like this:
Participation
The people that you invite will enter their name or an ID number in the field that says “Your name” and check the boxes in the time slots when they are free.  In the image above, the best time to meet would clearly be Monday at 1:00pm.
Notable Features:

  • Load Your Calendar: If you do open a Doodle account, you can sync your Google, Outlook, or iCal calendar to Doodle.  This lets you avoid switching between calendars, making it easier to respond quickly to scheduling requests.
  • Comments: There is even a comment section at the bottom of the poll where participants can note dates that they would prefer over others or ask questions about the event.
  • Different Viewing Options: The image shown above is the table view, which allows your participants to see which dates and times are popular.  There’s also an option to look at the schedule on a calendar view, shown below.  The calendar view is helpful if you have loaded your own calendar to Doodle for comparison.

partially reposted from  https://support.google.com/calendar/answer/37082 and https://doodle.com/about-doodle


Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Learn What It Takes to Refuse the Phishing Bait!




Authors Andrew Mantuano
PublisColumns:

Social engineering attacks come in all shapes and sizes — and not just through e-mail. 
Cybercriminals know the best strategies for gaining access to your institution’s sensitive data. In most cases, it doesn’t involve them rappelling from a ceiling’s skylight and deftly avoiding a laser detection system to hack into your servers; instead, they simply manipulate a community member.
According to IBM’s 2014 Cyber Security Intelligence Index, human error is a factor in 95 percent of security incidents. Following are a few ways to identify various types of social engineering attacks and their telltale signs.
  • Phishing isn’t relegated to just e-mail! Cybercriminals will also launch phishing attacks through phone calls, text messages, or other online messaging applications. Don’t know the sender or caller? Seem too good to be true? It’s probably a phishing attack.
  • Know the signs. Does the e-mail contain a vague salutation, spelling or grammatical errors, an urgent request, and/or an offer that seems impossibly good? Click that delete button.
  • Verify the sender. Check the sender’s e-mail address to make sure it’s legitimate. If it appears that your institution’s help desk is asking you to click on a link to increase your mailbox quota, but the sender is “UniversityHelpDesk@yahoo.com,” it’s a phishing message.
  • Don’t be duped by aesthetics. Phishing e-mails often contain convincing logos, links to actual company websites, legitimate phone numbers, and e-mail signatures of actual employees. However, if the message is urging you to take action — especially action such as sending sensitive information, clicking on a link, or downloading an attachment — exercise caution and look for other telltale signs of phishing attacks. Don’t hesitate to contact the company directly; they can verify legitimacy and may not even be aware that their name is being used for fraud.
  • Never, ever share your password. Did we say never? Yup, we mean never. Your password is the key to your identity, your data, and your classmates’ and colleagues’ data. It is for your eyes only. Your institution’s help desk or IT department will never ask you for your password.
  • Avoid opening links and attachments from unknown senders. Get into the habit of typing known URLs into your browser. Don’t open attachments unless you’re expecting a file from someone. Give them a call if you’re suspicious.
  • When you’re not sure, call to verify. Let’s say you receive an e-mail claiming to be from someone you know — a friend, colleague, or even the president of your college or university. Cybercriminals often spoof addresses to convince you, then request that you perform an action such as transfer funds or provide sensitive information. If something seems off about the e-mail, call them at a known number listed in your institution’s directory to confirm the request.
  • Don’t talk to strangers! Receive a call from someone you don’t know? Are they asking you to provide information or making odd requests? Hang up the phone and report it to the help desk.
  • Don’t be tempted by abandoned flash drives. Cybercriminals may leave flash drives lying around for victims to pick up and insert, thereby unknowingly installing malware on their computers. You might be tempted to insert a flash drive only to find out the rightful owner, but be wary — it could be a trap.
  • See someone suspicious? Say something. If you notice someone suspicious walking around or “tailgating” someone else, especially in an off-limits area, call campus safety.
Partially reposted from:  http://er.educause.edu/blogs/2016/11/february-2017-learn-what-it-takes-to-refuse-the-phishing-bait

Monday, February 13, 2017

RESOLVED - Emergency system maintenance this evening after 1:00 AM

Please be advised, ITS will be performing emergency system maintenance this evening, 2/14/2017 after 1:00 AM, that will temporarily affect a number of services. The affected services include:
  • Self-service Banner
  • Sign Sign On (SSO) for Banner
  • Verify stations (the One Card Database will be down temporarily)
  • Evisions
  • DegreeWorks
  • Paypal transactions
Services should be restored within 2 hours of the start of the interruption.

- - - - -

Updated at 1:58 AM, 2/14/2017:


All systems are back up.